DIY Terrarium in a Jar

JAR CRAFTS Published September 30th, 2013 3,891 views
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For the aspiring green-thumb, or just someone who wants to capture the beauty of nature inside a glass jar. These highly decorative terrariums will become your next addiction. You, and all others will be very impressed with your new work of art.

The first important part to building your new terrarium is to pick out a glass container or jar that you will love.

The second will be to figure out what type of plants you will want to include in your new design.

There are several types of plants to choose from that work very well with terrariums.

Types of Plants for Terrariums

Artillery Fern

Artillery Fern

Aluminum Plant

Aluminum Plant

Polka Dot Plant or Hypoestes

Polka Dot Plant or Hypoestes

Red-Veined Prayer Plant or Maranta

Red-Veined Prayer Plant or Maranta

Golden Pothos Vine

Golden Pothos Vine

Peperomia

Peperomia

Baby’s Tears

Baby’s Tears

Button Fern

Button Fern

Creeping Fig or Ficus Primula

Creeping Fig or Ficus Primula

Croton

Croton

These terrarium plants are exceptionally easy to grow, and care for. You may not have to water them for several months, and it would be pretty difficult to kill them. They have plenty of color, as well as shades of green that will make your terrarium really pop and stand out.

Color and grown patterns are what really will separate you from the next guy. With dozens of possibilities, let the creativity begin.

Using plants that have a variety of leaf shapes and color will be the best way process.

Cacti, aloe, and succulents are excellent choices. You can also use small ferns, ivy, moss, mini African violets, echeveria, and herbs.

How to Begin Planting

Start by making a one-inch thick layer of small rocks or stones at the bottom of your soon-to-be terrarium. Proper drainage is an absolute must, so you cannot skip this step.

Is your terrarium going to be completely closed in, or is it going to be open to external air supply? Either way you choose, you will do just fine. Just pay attention to the next paragraph.

After you’ve added one inch of rocks or stones, add a one-inch layer of sphagnum moss. If you have chosen a completely enclosed terrarium, instead of sphagnum moss, use activated charcoal. Activated charcoal can be found in pet stores in the aquarium department.

Next, add a good layer of soil (or sand if using only cacti).

Finally, gently remove your starter plants from their plastic containers.

When you are placing your plants into the soil, you may find it useful to have a wooden spoon, chopsticks, or something of that nature in order to nudge the plant into your terrarium ‘ground’.

Once you have a pretty solid draft put together, you will want to add more soil or sand around the plants in order to hide the root ball.

Gently tap the dirt or sand down, add some water, and you’re done.

The soil should be checked by pressing down on it with a finger. If it is wet, leave it be. If dry, add more water until the soil is damp all over again.

These plants can last for years, and can even go several months without requiring water.

Avoid direct sunlight, but provide plenty of natural light to your new display.

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